Layers of loveliness…


Layers and layers of Dahlia petals. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Took a walk this morning and was stopped still by these blossoms. They appear to be the treasured tuber-growing Dahlias. Their dainty charm requires that tubers be dug and preserved carefully during cold winters and replanted in the warming spring days.

The Dahlia you brought to our isle
Your praises forever shall speak

‘Mid gardens as sweet as your smile
And colour as bright as your cheek.

–Lord Holland (1773–1840)

The flower reminds me of layers of petticoats worn in days of yore. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg.

Ahhhhh……the lovely Dahlia. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Shades of gold…


Young maple grove copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Young maple grove copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

The many maples throughout the forest had predominantly yellow leaves, except for a few trees such as this one.

Maple leaves copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Maple leaves copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

This website has clear, yet detailed explanations for the specific colors found in autumn leaves: http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/pubs/leaves/leaves.shtm.

Delicately strong…


Yellow coneflower copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Yellow coneflower copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Prairie winds torment photographers. Dusk’s side lighting with the sky’s gentle ambient glow soothes the soul. This evening the winds were gusty as a cold front drew near and the sun began its descent. A lens shade and polarizing filter are usual additions to my lens for such settings.

Prairie winds copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Prairie winds copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Yellow Coneflower (Ratibida pinnata) danced chaotically. Each petal on each bloom seemed to have its own different idea of which way to go. Don’t be fooled by the delicacy of this flower. Nature’s resilience gives strength to prairie blooms so that they can withstand the frequent and ever changing winds. Yellow Coneflower survives urbanization better than most prairie natives.

Tribute to the sun…


Sunflower with Black Eyed Susan copyright 2012 Pamela Breitberg

A Sunflower bloomed this week underneath our birdfeeder; germinating from a seed neglected by birds, chipmunk, squirrel and deer. Surrounded by Black Eyed Susans it quietly reminds us that they are the most brilliant tribute to the source of life giving energy for all things on Earth. The sun has shown brightly this summer through many cloud free days yielding record high temperatures and record low precipitation. This recipe has produced miniature versions of usually grandiose perennials and these two self seeders. Stunted by lack of hydration this Sunflower is a simple two feet in stature and the Black Eyed Susan manage eighteen inches.

Sunflower coyright 2012 Pamela Breitberg