Freedom to bind…


This is a member of the lovely vining Morning Glory family, opening its blossoms as the morning light highlights its beauty. However, this species is one of those non-native, Eurasian varieties that is a dreaded invasive visitor in American gardens. Known as Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) I enjoyed taking its portrait during a morning bike ride along a Lake Michigan pathway in Lincoln Park, far from any cultivated gardens. They appeared a fair distance from a prairie restoration area and were isolated from the golf course by a stone wall making their appearance more tolerable to the native purist. This Bind Weed did emulate its name wrapping around other vegetation proliferating this informal, unplanned area of horticulture.

Portrait of an invader (pretty but unfriendly). Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Catching the sunlight. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Busy morning on the Bind Weed Morning Glory. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

 

Captivating foreigner…


A Dandelion (Traxacum officinal) Eurasian flower is actually a composite of many small flowers. Every part of it edible. Children have entertained themselves by blowing the feathery seeds off the stem, watching them float carefree through the warm summer air. Dandelions are weeds in North America, and weeds are aggressive non-sharers of space and resources. However, if you welcome Dandelion into your garden as food or entertainment then you would not consider them an invasive weed.

I marvel at the intricate design of this flower and it’s ability to change from a sea of hot summer yellow to plump pillows of white. Admittedly, it is unwanted in my yard; I am part of the majority who consider it a weed. So any I find in my garden are removed plant by plant during the year.

I admire this beauty in nearby meadows and parklands. And yes, I still enjoy the challenge of blowing the seeds off the stem in one breath.

Closeup of Dandelion bloom cluster. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Closeup of Dandelion bloom cluster. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Dandelions in the grass. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Dandelions in the grass. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg