Look at each element…


Beauty and wonder can be found if everything, every part. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Study each level of detail, the near and the far, the center and the edge to discover nature’s awesomeness. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

On the move…


Seeds ready to be dispersed, ensuring continuation of the cycle of life. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Empty brackets. Now is the time of winter’s dormancy. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Final show of the roses…


One of the last Rose blooms in Lincoln Park. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

One of the last Rose blooms in Lincoln Park. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Macro view of Rose prior to the formation of the “hip”. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Flowers still bloom in the fall…


Took a leisurely walk around South Pond in Chicago’s Lincoln Park; situated just south of the Zoo. The weather was remarkably warm for mid-November; in the upper 60s. FYI, winter is on the way tonight, just in time for Christmas/Thanksgiving parades. Many perennials continued their bloom while going to seed in preparation for dormant months ahead.

Jerusalem Artichoke still in bloom along the restored prairie surrounding South Pond in Lincoln Park. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Bloom and bud along Lincoln Park’s South Pond. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Yellow bouquet among the drying prairie grasses. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Yellow bouquet among the drying prairie grasses. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Hardy Hydrangea’s were mostly going to seed as their colors faded to earthen colors; but one bloom still drew it’s own attention. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg.

Autumn stages…


 

Wilting Jerusalem Artichoke with fallen leaf caught by spider web. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

End of bloom Jerusalem Artichoke with fallen leaf caught by spider web. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Hibiscus plant in flower and seed. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Hibiscus plant in flower and seed. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

End of summer…


Macro view of Hydrangea bloom and seeds. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Macro view of Hydrangea bloom and seeds. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

 

Drying on-the-vine Hydrangea

Color-fading blossoms

Flowers turns to seed

Perennial preparation for

A season’s passing days.

 

NOTE: The pink, or blue, color of the Hydrangea is known to be controllable. See the following information: www.hydrangeashydrangeas.com/colorchange.html

Closeup of Hydrangea bloom changing to seed. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Closeup of Hydrangea bloom changing to seed. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

 

Hydrangea seeds in Lincoln Park, Chicago. copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Hydrangea seeds in Lincoln Park, Chicago. copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Light and shadow of a macro view of Hydrangea. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Light and shadow of a macro view of Hydrangea. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

After the monarchs…



Seeds bursting from pod with Milkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Seeds bursting from pod with Milkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed pod full of MIlkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed pod full of MIlkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed acting as host of Milkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed acting as host of Milkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed (asclepias syriaca) is the chosen food of Monarch butterflies. Eggs are laid on the plant and larva feast on the leaves. Much has been reported on the loss of habitat for Monarchs including this Milkweed, not to be confused with the orange blooming Butterfly Milkweed (asclepias tuberosa). Loss of habitat has led to dramatically reduced populations of these wonderful creatures.

This Common Milkweed plant attracted me with its delicate fluffy seeds that had recently burst out of several pods. They always remind me of one segment of the Disney movie, Fantasia. As I focused on the seeds, I noticed a few brightly colored Milkweed Bugs. Several moments later, I realized the “brown” pod above the seeds was actually a community of Milkweed Bugs on one pod. The Milkweed Butterfly has left this northern area and begun its 3000-mile migration to Mexico, while the Milkweed Bug enjoys the remaining spoils of this host plant.