Morning…


 

Mid-morning at Anglin’s Pier, Lauderdale by the Sea, Florida. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

 A new morning

Same but different

Always in motion

Never still

Ever changing

Yet

Continually the same.

Sea grass blowing in wind. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Boater managing thier way through energetic ocean. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

 

 

Strong willed…


Herring Gull at the shore’s edge hunting for breakfast. They are one of the larger gulls in the Ft. Lauderdale area. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

This Herring Gull was not intimidated by robust morning waves in his pursuit of ghost crabs.

Patience required as the tides act as obstacles when searching for food. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Waves harmonies …


‘Tis a joy to capture the wonders of the continual harmony between the earth, sky and water.

Day of many white caps and rip tides. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Day of many white caps and rip tides. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

The science teacher in me is taken by these images all taken on the same morning a few weeks ago. They unintendedly show motion in three forms of matter: solid, liquid and gas. The “liquid” image stops the dramatic motion of an energetic Atlantic Ocean. The “solid” image is evidence of past motion of the sand. And the “gas” image shows seagulls and clouds aided by the winds above the Atlantic Ocean near the shoreline.

Too practical and sterile for the appreciation of God’s wonders for you? Me too. So I wish you a wonder-filled day as you enjoy the images for their grace and beauty.

The eternal winds move both clouds and gulls. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

The eternal winds move both clouds and gulls. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Waves of sand, courtosey of the winds and ocean waves. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Waves of sand, courtesy of the winds and ocean waves. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

 

 

 

Man or Jelly…


Downward reconnaissance is strongly encouraged if bare feet is the m.o. for a morning beach stroll. What one sees in the sand foreshadows what one may encounter if they add an ocean plunge to their morning. Simply said, watch out for things that STING. On Florida’s Atlantic Ocean beaches there are two contrastingly named creatures of woe that one may come upon.

The Portuguese Man-of-War (Physalia physalis) has a name worthy of its terror while the Moon Jellyfish (Aurelia aurita)’s name suggests an delightful storybook character. Sighting either of these creatures will cause pause and caution with each future step; being stung by either, even when they lie dead on the beach, is not fun! Their presence in the sand is a warning that others may also be found in nearby ocean waters. Wait to swim until a later time.

I had only seen the Man-of-War on prior visits. Assuming their jelly like bodies qualified them to be Jellyfish. Beach goers soon educated me that they were Man-of-War. Learning their name my respect for their powers increased dramatically. I was “lucky” enough to encounter BOTH species this past New Year; both the seriously named as well as the playfully named dreaded creatures. The Jellyfish fascinated me with their simplicity. I am equally fascinated by the un-animal appearance of the Man-of-War too. I kept my distance and stayed out of the water.

Portuguese Man-of-War (Physalia physalis) is so named from its resemblance to an 18th century armed sailing ship in full sail; it is a smaller model of course. Wikipedia says: “Despite its outward appearance, the Portuguese man o’ war is not a common jellyfish but a siphonophore, which is not actually a single multicellular organism, but a colony of specialized minute individuals called zooids.[1] These zooids are attached to one another and physiologically integrated to the extent that they are incapable of independent survival.”

Moon Jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) has a name describes it well, helping you know you are observing. Many of the Jellyfish I saw were actually just partial, the “mesoglea” or jelly, which is the last part of the fish to decompose. I have seen numerous Man-of-War on a morning beach; but the Jellyfish were greatly larger in number as they are known to arrive, adding to their intrigue and my fearful respect. Adding to my interest was a pinkish/yellowish “thing” inside  which I learned are the gonads (male are pink, female are yellow).

Nature never ceases to amaze and entertain and educate me. Yet I still question such contrasting names for such similar looking and acting species. Guess the name is in the brain of the discoverer? Or the name is the perspective of the discoverer?

Two STINGY creatures of the beach and sea, the blue rimmed Man-of-War and the Moon Jellyfish.    copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Two STINGY creatures of the beach and sea, the blue rimmed Man-of-War and the Moon Jellyfish. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Moon Jellyfish, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Moon Jellyfish, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

More low tide patterns…


Shoreline tide pattern, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Shoreline tide pattern, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Pattern and design, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Pattern and design, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Shells arranged by the tides, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Shells arranged by the tides, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

 

Natural beach design, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Natural beach design, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Stabilizing beauty…


Beach Sunflower (Helianthus debilis), aka Cucumber-leafed Sunflower was found at the south end of the Galt Mile stretch of the Ft. Lauderdale beach, at the Oakland Park Blvd. entrance to the beach. This is a plant that endures a setting of frequent drought and salt. Stabilizing rapidly, this beautiful flower becomes a sizeable groundcover, helping control beach erosion.

Sun on the beach, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Sun on the beach, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Groundcover of Beach Sunflower, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Groundcover of Beach Sunflower, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Beach Sunflower bloom, copyright 2014, Pamela Breitberg

Beach Sunflower bloom, copyright 2014, Pamela Breitberg