Durable, beneficial, loveliness…


This delicate bloom can withstand the harsh shoreline environment including winds and waters. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

This delicate bloom can withstand the harsh shoreline environment including winds and waters. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Time on the beach, for me, includes checking out the plants on the inland edges. My newness to the area had me assuming that this thick, prolific mass was native to the area. Closer study has taught me this is not the case.

Natal Plum (Carissa macrocarpa) is the African relative of Florida’s native Coco Plum. Both species live on the sandy shores. Both have edible plum-like fruits. Natal Plums’s invasive character includes spine tipped leaves which are oft overlooked with focus going to their graceful year-long blooming white flowers and reddish fruit.

After flowering the Natal Plum fruits emerge here, still too unripe for eating. The “plum” is the only non-poisonous part of the Natal Plum. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Ready to eat Natal Plum. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Change of pace


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Playtime on Lauderdale by the Sea’s beach in Florida. Copyrght 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Who knew?

January

Here is SUN and SAND and SALTWATER.

Who knew?

January

doesn’t have to mean SNOW and COLD.

Here a beach tractor raking the sand

Replaces the snow plows in the streets of Chicago.

Here families and couples wear light clothing as they play at the ocean’s edge

Forgetting the boots, coats, mittens and hats required for snowmen building and sledding.

Who knew?

January

Here is SUN and SAND and SALTWATER.

Beach is raked each morning, as an ecologically friendly way to "pretty" up last night's high tide's treasures. My goal is to walk the beach to treasure hunt for shells and coral before they are hidden under the sand.

The beach is raked each morning, as an ecologically friendly way to “pretty” up last night’s high tide’s treasures. My goal is to walk the beach to treasure hunt for shells and coral before they are hidden under the sand. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

 

Early morning family play while a couple take a selfie to remember their date on the beach. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Salty cluster…


Arc'd blooms clustered under these succulent leaves along the shore. Unsure what this shrub-like plant is, but it is a regular planting along Ft. Lauderdale beaches. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Arc’d blooms clustered under these succulent leaves along the shore. Unsure what this shrub-like plant is, but it is a regular planting along Ft. Lauderdale beaches. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Stabilizing beauty…


Beach Sunflower (Helianthus debilis), aka Cucumber-leafed Sunflower was found at the south end of the Galt Mile stretch of the Ft. Lauderdale beach, at the Oakland Park Blvd. entrance to the beach. This is a plant that endures a setting of frequent drought and salt. Stabilizing rapidly, this beautiful flower becomes a sizeable groundcover, helping control beach erosion.

Sun on the beach, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Sun on the beach, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Groundcover of Beach Sunflower, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Groundcover of Beach Sunflower, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Beach Sunflower bloom, copyright 2014, Pamela Breitberg

Beach Sunflower bloom, copyright 2014, Pamela Breitberg

Emergent succulent…


This image shows new Sea Purslane (Sesuvium portulacastrum), a salt-loving, heat tolerant vine that easily anchors in sand dunes and beaches. The stalk is red when exposed to salt and sand; both of which were plentiful at this location, Lauderdale by the Sea’s beach. The pink flowers had not yet developed, but will be present year-round once the plant matures. More and more green space is appearing on the beach as erosion efforts have become more “natural”.

Sea Purslane , copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Sea Purslane , copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Snow diversion…


Florida beach bloom copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Florida beach bloom copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Time for this blogger to think warmer thoughts. Five degrees and getting colder with future forecast of more snow and negative temperatures through the beginning of next week. What a winter! I am one of the sillies that actually LOVE the snow. But the severe cold is something I would rather ignore, if only that were possible.

Is this a Petunia? copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Is this a Petunia? copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

So in this post I share with you a couple images from my New Year’s in Lauderdale by the Sea, Florida. I am a novice in identification of tropical blooms. This one was at the edge of the beach, as evidenced by the wet sprinkles of sand on the seemingly delicate petals. There are several vining plants here; notice the two varieties of leaf shapes. The flower resembles Petunia, but the leaves closest to the flower do not seem to fit such a descriptive.

Share you insights with this Northerner. I have much to learn still. Warm wishes to all.