Catching the fallen…


Fallen tree leaves caught by Decorative Cabbage. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Accompanying the Cabbage are purple Chrysanthemums with dried fallen leaves nestled around the hardy blooms. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Calming moment of closeness…


 

Prolific vine on estate's antique fence. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Prolific vine on estate’s antique fence. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Some Chicago neighborhoods are host to turn-of-the-century town homes. Many have established gardens, possibly of similar age, at least the perennials appear to belong to the established homes. This image was taken in Wicker Park neighborhood, which though rich with condominiums still had several blocks of stately town home mansions on generous sized lots.

The cautioning black iron fence surrounding one property was softened with this vine bursting with feathery white blooms. Closer views show the delicate beauty of the flowers. White on white with tender shades of green lend for a calming moment of focus during an otherwise city walk.

Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Portrait of a blossom. Copyright 201, Pamela Breitberg

Portrait of a blossom. Copyright 201, Pamela Breitberg

Community meeting place…


Young (brown heads) and elder (white heads) Brown Pelicans gather at Anglin's Pier in Lauderdale by the Sea, Florida, much to my pleasure.  copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Young (brown heads) and elder (white heads) Brown Pelicans gather at Anglin’s Pier in Lauderdale by the Sea, Florida, much to my pleasure. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Scruffy looking Brown Pelican adults groom and stealthily watch anglers and tourists. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Scruffy looking Brown Pelican adults groom and stealthily watch anglers and tourists. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Old man misnomer…


Daisy Fleabane copyright 2012 Pamela Breitberg

Daisy Fleabane (Erigeron strigosus), a bright spot among grasses is oft considered a weed by persons is a treasured host for many native insects. Dried and stuffed into mattresses or hung from the rafters to ward off fleas, a long going ritual of settlers to America, Fleabane actually attracts fleas and many other insects. I’m not sure when it was discovered that this tradition was ineffective, but perhaps it was the best guess of the time.

This early old man (Latin origin of erigeron) does rise to bloom early in the season, often in late spring. It’s handsome flower is followed by fuzzy white seedheads, hence sealing it’s fate as “erigeron”.