When a rose is not a rose…


Swamp Rose Mallow (Hibiscus moscheutos)
is a perennial Hibiscus species native to Illinois. This is a rose with no thorns, no arresting fragrance, but a striking presence indeed.

These images look at the subject from the side and rear which draws attention to the patterns and details of this giant blossom.

Beauty in the details. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Details of a large “Rose“. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Swamp Rose Mallow bud and flower. Copyright 207 Pamela Breitberg


 

Freedom to bind…


This is a member of the lovely vining Morning Glory family, opening its blossoms as the morning light highlights its beauty. However, this species is one of those non-native, Eurasian varieties that is a dreaded invasive visitor in American gardens. Known as Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) I enjoyed taking its portrait during a morning bike ride along a Lake Michigan pathway in Lincoln Park, far from any cultivated gardens. They appeared a fair distance from a prairie restoration area and were isolated from the golf course by a stone wall making their appearance more tolerable to the native purist. This Bind Weed did emulate its name wrapping around other vegetation proliferating this informal, unplanned area of horticulture.

Portrait of an invader (pretty but unfriendly). Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Catching the sunlight. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Busy morning on the Bind Weed Morning Glory. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

 

Portrait of Chicago…


These Allium are ornamental yet apropos to be a statement in Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo. These Allium are a variety of onion. Chicago means “wild onion”, so fitting they are among the wild animals.

The single bright bloom is complemented by the just-past-prime flowers surrounding it, keeping attention on itself.

Aptly named…


The Bottlebrush Tree (Callistemon Sp.) at Florida’s Butterfly World. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Closeup of the “bottle bristles” in bloom. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg.

A favorite of butterflies, the Bottle Brush Tree is appropriately named and placed inside Butterfly World, Florida.

What’s in a name…”


I’ve added a page, something that seemed to be missing from this blog. An explanation behind my blog’s chosen name. Check out the “What’s In A Name” tab on the left.

A common northerner, or so I think…


White Pine...or so assumed, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

White Pine…or so assumed, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Best guess, is sometimes the best I can do when it comes to identifying a plant species. Snowfall challenges my abilities further. Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus L.) is my best guess for this common evergreen in our neighborhood. Most trees were planted in effort to provide green accents in newly built residential sites.

Though the 48 inches of January followed by yesterday’s 4 inches are trying the patience of the heartiest around here, the temperature was well above zero yesterday. We were a balmy 30 degrees (Fahrenheit), so I ventured out for an hour-long vigorous walk. Only half of our day’s snow total had landed, so I grabbed our waterproof Nikon Coolpix camera. I don’t mind walking in active snowfall; but I respect my lenses’ care needs. It seems that White Pine seeds prefer a moist environment, so I’m assuming their needs have been met this winter.

Pinec one wrapped in fresh snow, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Pinec one wrapped in fresh snow, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Trouble for some…


Not so innocent Trouble copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Not so innocent Trouble copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Contented Trouble copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Contented Trouble copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Trouble resides at the near-by stable. Imagine a wild, small game hunter who craves the warmth of human kindnesses.  Her split personality shows its sweet side in human’s presence allowing her welcome access to each neighbor’s gardens. Since our beloved Tigger has passed, Trouble has added our garden to her expansive territory and into our hearts. Her choice spot is directly under our bird bath, so it is certain the birds don’t share our welcoming attitudes.