Trying to pay attention…


My macro lens is one of my favorites because with its use I have permission to stare at others. I can spend time intimately observing the tiny, abundant insect communities that most often are ignored. Sometimes I am surprised when my camera captures details and subjects that were unnoticed by me. This image is a prime example of such recorded evidence. I was focused on the Comma butterfly. I saw the one fly above the butterfly. I did not see the one below. And I absolutely did not realize the “spots” on the adjacent leaf were alive!

So much goes on around us all the time that is oblivious to us. Such findings make me keenly aware that my ability to see the world and make sense of it continually needs practice. This is true with people as well as nature.

Comma butterfly with others of the community. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Naturally…


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Proliferation of beautiful pale blooms. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Delicate wonder. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Delicate wonder. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Synonyms for “naturally” include obviously, logically, unsurprisingly, certainly and indeed. The flowers below are growing in the natural, tropical habitat. Unsurprisingly they flourish when allowed to live naturally.

Tropical bloom Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Tropical bloom Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Flowering Palm. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Flowering Palm. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

 

Tulip Tree in bloom. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Naturally thriving orchids. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Signature ecosystem…


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Moss laden log. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg.


The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert is a story that seamlessly integrates meticulous botanical details into your knowledge base as one reads this coming-of-age love story. The uniquely original ecosystems of moss are one such topic. Walking through the forest this past fall, this scene on the forest floor reminded me of Alma Whittaker’s fascination with such ecosystems. I felt somewhat guilty not returning regularly to document the changes within.

After the monarchs…



Seeds bursting from pod with Milkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Seeds bursting from pod with Milkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed pod full of MIlkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed pod full of MIlkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed acting as host of Milkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed acting as host of Milkweed Bugs. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Common Milkweed (asclepias syriaca) is the chosen food of Monarch butterflies. Eggs are laid on the plant and larva feast on the leaves. Much has been reported on the loss of habitat for Monarchs including this Milkweed, not to be confused with the orange blooming Butterfly Milkweed (asclepias tuberosa). Loss of habitat has led to dramatically reduced populations of these wonderful creatures.

This Common Milkweed plant attracted me with its delicate fluffy seeds that had recently burst out of several pods. They always remind me of one segment of the Disney movie, Fantasia. As I focused on the seeds, I noticed a few brightly colored Milkweed Bugs. Several moments later, I realized the “brown” pod above the seeds was actually a community of Milkweed Bugs on one pod. The Milkweed Butterfly has left this northern area and begun its 3000-mile migration to Mexico, while the Milkweed Bug enjoys the remaining spoils of this host plant.

Value still…


Twisted, gnarled, bent, weathered. Layers of tissue separated and wrinkled show evidence of age. Once tall, rugged and solid this giant is still a valued shelter for wildlife.

Dead tree parts that are actively depended on by the living for safe shelter. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Dead tree parts that are actively depended on by the living for safe shelter. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg