Nature’s artistry…


Nature is the original creator of designs and patterns. Some aid survival such as camouflage. Other patterns change by the moment such as these images of the ocean. Sunlight, clouds and winds are part of nature’s toolbox used to form these passing conceptions. God’s artistry inspires and challenges our limited imaginations.

The sunlit sky with horizontal bright area mimic the horizontal bright areas on the top (horizon area) of the sea. Or is it vice versa? Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Only the ocean here; no sky in this composition. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

The eyes are drawn naturally to the lightest area; here it is part of the ocean. The rest of the ocean mimics the calm atmosphere above. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Look at each element…


Beauty and wonder can be found if everything, every part. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Study each level of detail, the near and the far, the center and the edge to discover nature’s awesomeness. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

A favorite miracle…


My favorite Hydrangea is the “snow ball”, it brings out the kid in me. But these are wonderful too: Oak Leaf Hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia). Multi-blossom flowers in one bloom are one of God’s awesome miracles; layers and layers of exquisiteness.

Oak leaves and blooms. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Oak Leaf Hydrangea buds and blooms. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Close up of Oak Leaf Hydrangea. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg.

Meticulous particulars…


These Iris twins were potted alongside a storefront. Different focus points reveal nature’s in-depth consideration to details and design.

Twin Iris in bloom showing their same amazingly detailed patterning. The white wall makes for a unconfusing background, keeping the attention to the Iris. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Detail of the Iris’ stamen are in focus. The out-of-focus petals force attention to the flower’s center. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Close-up focus on the inner petal portions. The stamen is out-of-focus sufficiently to keep the viewer’s eyes on the petals. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Wandering attention…


Driftwood resting temporarily on the shore. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Sunrise is blocked by thick clouds while father and son share quality time. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Rules can be broken. Artists, including photographers, know that light objects draw the most attention in a scene. Careful composition makes sure that subjects are either the lightest item in a scene or they are placed inside the lightest area to insure the viewer clearly knows who/what is most important. These two images break that rule; both images have the subject very dark with lighter areas away from the subject.

The effect of placing the subject outside the brightest area forces the viewer to look at the entire image. Eyes will wander through the image and finally rest on the dark subject. These both are complicated scenes, with multiple interest areas to be viewed and enjoyed. Despite these complicated scenes, the primary subject in each image is clearly evident.