Restorative reflections…


Shasta Daisy (Leucanthemum x superbum) began its long bloom period a little early this summer in St. Louis. Actually, it began blooming in early June, at the end of springtime. This allowed me to create these images in a garden I passed during a morning walk. Such walks and encounters dispel anxieties and remind me of their triviality. Daisys also remind me of my mother; they were her favorite flowers. So many emotions worked through me during this particular walk; therapeutic reflections of life as I admired these mid-life blooms.

Singled out of a crowd. All the same, yet different. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Shasta Daisys in abundance. This image has a few in focus in the lower part of the image so that you can grasp the full abundance of this Daisy garden. Copyright 2027 Pamela Breitberg

Petite bouquets…


Eastern Daisy Fleabane (Erigeron annuus) shows up voluntarily along paths and roadsides. The flowers are thumbnail sized and bloom in bouquet arrangements tempting passersby to capture their loveliness. Today I brought them home as images saved.

Portrait of Daily Fleabane. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Nature’s bouquet. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Wandering attention…


Driftwood resting temporarily on the shore. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Sunrise is blocked by thick clouds while father and son share quality time. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Rules can be broken. Artists, including photographers, know that light objects draw the most attention in a scene. Careful composition makes sure that subjects are either the lightest item in a scene or they are placed inside the lightest area to insure the viewer clearly knows who/what is most important. These two images break that rule; both images have the subject very dark with lighter areas away from the subject.

The effect of placing the subject outside the brightest area forces the viewer to look at the entire image. Eyes will wander through the image and finally rest on the dark subject. These both are complicated scenes, with multiple interest areas to be viewed and enjoyed. Despite these complicated scenes, the primary subject in each image is clearly evident.

Subtle reminders…


The fuzzy seed heads are Goldenrod, whose flowers were a short while ago bright golden yellow. The background is the golden flowers of Jerusalem Artichoke, unintentionally reminding us of the recent blaze that was Goldenrod.

Goldenrod in seed, Lincoln Park, Chicago. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

The long lens allowed for a short depth of field making the Goldenrod in focus and the background Jerusalem Artichoke to fade in detail. Despite the strong yellow color in a large portion of the image, the contrast in focus makes it clear to the viewer that the attention belongs to the seed heads in this image.

Attention please…


Photographing the same scene but choosing a different composition guides one to select a different focal point; the main subject matter is changed by the composition choice. The image with the bridge centered leads the eye to the skyscrapers. The image with less skyline reveals that there is a person on the bridge. They are in the first image; but the composition didn’t “lead you” to notice them before.

View of downtown Chicago from Lincoln Park's South Pond. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

View of downtown Chicago from Lincoln Park’s South Pond. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Lincoln Park’s South Pond in Chicago with reflection of skyscrapers in water. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Nature’s foreshadowing…


Natural bouquet of Frost Aster. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

This native perennial is aptly named, Frost Aster (Symphyotrichum pilosum). It is one of the last blooming perennials in Chicago-land, ending only when a hard frost sets the stage for winter’s dormancy. The abundance of blooms is magnified by the circumstance that the plant is a rhizome, existing as spreading gatherings of the parent plant. The previous post showed the Frost Aster along the lakefront path in Lincoln Park. Those colonies lived on the side of the wall opposite of Lake Michigan, preferring the dryer environment of a gravel path.

Attention is focused as the sun momentarily spot lights this bouquet. I centered the composition, to emphasize the natural vignette around this vibrant cluster.

May frost come later than sooner.

For more information on Frost Aster: http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/weeds/plants/fr_aster.htm