Freshly fallen…


Still lovely, as it’s freshly fallen off the stem. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Multiple stages of life appear on this perennial. Flowering averages three weeks on summer perennials. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Today there was an abundance of fallen flowers. What surprised me was the falling of complete flowers; usually petals fall one at a time. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Welcome back to the World…


The Butterfly World in Coconut Creek Florida seems like a world to itself. Today I am sharing a few images from last winter’s visit. They reopened today: https://www.butterflyworld.com/hurricane-closure-and-preparation/, and will release the butterflies and finches back into their outdoor habitats. There was no damage to the facilities by Irma.

A resting Clipper butterfly. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg.

Rain drenched stills butterflies; they are unable to fly with wet wings. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Macro image of butterfly among the flora. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

White Morpho butterfly. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg.

Thoas Swallowtail feeding on bananas in a dish. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg. I am unsure why its “tails” seem to be missing.

Reverential fear…


Stay safe everyone in Irma’s path. Midwesterners are credited with strong health and stamina because they deal with multiple seasons and weather events. But those that live on a sea coast are the most determined to be resilient against nature’s energetic presence. Prayers for wisdom and calm as you deal with Irma’s invasion.

These images share the subtle beauty along Florida’s seashore.

Hunker down in a secure location fellow Floridians. God be with you. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

The beauty of the coast shall return. Nature is healing as well. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Power and brilliance. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

 

Dangerously cute…


Cute but with powerful built-in defenses. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg.

While we walked through Starved Rock State Park we came across this oh, so cute caterpillar. It was moving rapidly down the length of a rail making it a challenge to photograph. This is when I’m grateful for digital imagery; I can take multiple images in hopes of a few “good” ones and the cost is no obstacle as it was in the days of using film.

Fortunately, I did not choose to hold this fuzzy fellow. It was the larva of the American Dagger Moth (Acronicta americana). If I’d known the name I would have thought twice about its cuddly appearance. The decorative black spikes are its defense containing a poisonous liquid that quickly causes irritation and swelling when it touches one’s skin. So, if you see this fellow, look but don’t touch!

On closer inspection…


The Winged Loosestrife’s (Lythrum alatum) vibrant color stood out on the cliff’s wall across from our descending path to Wild Cat Canyon in Starved Rock State Park. Only later when I was home and reviewing these images did I realize the plant was a resting spot for this winged insect. Such is the joy of photography. My eyes often miss seeing all the subjects in my compositions. Sometimes what I capture is distracting to my desired focus (unwanted elements in the background). This added subject was a wonderful surprise.

My initial thought was that this insect was a dragonfly or damselfly. But those insects have two pairs of wings. I am guessing that this is some variety of Crane Fly (Tipula) instead. The other joy of nature photography is that I am always learning!

I zoomed in to get the original picture (bottom image) and found a new and more interesting composition when I zoomed in still closer (first image).

Posing nicely for my picture. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

I spo

Longer view of this Loosestrife and Crane Fly scene, to show more of the habitat. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

tted

 

Under-valued communities…


Fungi (mushrooms) and algae produce lichen on this dead tree stump. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Yesterday’s post of Lichen was witness to what happens when fungi and algae live together. The fungi benefit from algae that make food through photosynthesis. These images show the lush diversity within these miniature communities. I always feel the presence of a superior entity (God, to me) when I observe such creations.

Colony of mushrooms appear after rains; on less moist days the fungi thrives underground. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

 

Never seen this kind of fungi. The variety at Starved Rock after a few days of rain were many and diverse. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Fungi ring around the tree stump. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

This tree hosts a prolific, rich community. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

The moist walls of the canyon supports more miniature communities. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg.

Too often ignored…


Lichen on top of cliff’s edge. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

This Lichen lives atop a rock at Lover’s Leap in Starved Rock State Park. Though its tiny, its resilience merits appreciation.

Difference between fungi, lichen, moss and algae: https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/blogs/you-moss-be-joking-if-you-lichen-this-to-fungi