Spring color…


Violet on forest floor, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Violet on forest floor, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Portrait of Violets, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Portrait of Violets, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

More of my posts on Violets:  “Branched cluster of violet flowers” Sept. 2011; “Silent graces” June 2014; “Native survivors” July 2013; “Essence of tradition” October 2013; “Old fashion” October 2013

Eye-level insights…


Getting down to a child’s eye level is the best way to appreciate them. Children are less intimidated when you’re at their level inviting an opportunity for them to open up to new ideas and share their thinking. This learned lesson from years as a teacher, is similarly applicable when photographing wildlife.

An eye level view with spring wild flowers is worth a little dirt on the knees. Tip One: wear long pants to avoid irritations and be careful to not crush your subjects. The forest floor is plentiful with blooms this spring. I’m unsure if it is a result of restoration in this area, or if the temperatures and precipitation were perfect for such abundance.

These images of the native White Trout Lily (Erythronium albidum)
show a top and inside view of its flower. The inside view of the flower is only possible from a ground level perspective because the plant is only 5-6 inches tall and the flower faces downward when open. Tip Two: spend a few extra minutes getting to know other low growing (and moving) wildlife while at your new vantage point.

See “It’s Complicated” posted October 2013 for more information about the White Trout Lily.

White Trout Lily in bloom, copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

White Trout Lily in bloom, copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Top down view of Trout Lily, copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Top down view of Trout Lily, copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

White Trout Lily on forest floor, copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

White Trout Lily on forest floor, copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Seeds of motherhood…


Mothers sometimes go unnoticed. Under appreciated too often. In addition, sometimes, mothers have the potential to bring forth life in others. Look at this image of literally, the fruit of a mothering tree.

For today, alone, I am ignoring that each plant is usually both male and female. I am using my myopic vision to see plants as the mothers they are, who bear new life fruits from their seeds with the help of other neighboring mother plants.

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY!

A Mother's bounty, Happy Mother's Day to all of nature's mothers. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

A Mother’s bounty, Happy Mother’s Day to all of nature’s mothers. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Value still…


Twisted, gnarled, bent, weathered. Layers of tissue separated and wrinkled show evidence of age. Once tall, rugged and solid this giant is still a valued shelter for wildlife.

Dead tree parts that are actively depended on by the living for safe shelter. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Dead tree parts that are actively depended on by the living for safe shelter. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Brilliant fuzz…


Seeds shining brilliantly in the late afternoon sun at Lincoln Park's. North Pond, Chicago. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Seeds shining brilliantly in the late afternoon sun at Lincoln Park’s. North Pond, Chicago. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Red ear slider turtles sunning near edge of North Pond, Lincoln Park.  Setting for this tree in fuzzy seed stage. copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Red ear slider turtles sunning near edge of North Pond, Lincoln Park. Setting for this tree in fuzzy seed stage. copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg