Unique personalities…


If flowers had personality, Purple Coneflowers (echinacia purpurea) come closest to displaying their single charms, each different from another. Flowers arrange petals similarly with enough difference to appear to have unique natures. Enjoy these images and consider my tendencies of natural personification when describing these matured Purple Coneflowers.

Let's talk. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Let’s talk. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

The leader. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

The leader. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Energetic personality. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Energetic personality. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Asking for attention. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Asking for attention. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

What is your first impression? Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

What is your first impression? Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Dancing with joy. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Dancing with joy. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Cowlick on bloom? Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Cowlick on bloom? Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

The buck stops here…


I try to avoid clichés and puns in my posts. Nevertheless, guess I am just in a silly mood today. We have two bucks visiting our yard to dine on the Yews and Hostas and Lilies. This one is the larger and older of the two. Always a joy to watch.

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Buck visiting our garden from neighboring Forest Preserve. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Change of subject…


At first my eye was drawn to the opening Purple Coneflower. Newly emerged petals are pale green, which gradually, over several days, turn to pinky-purple when they have grown to their full length. Purple Coneflower are a favorite subject. More images of this returning favorite will follow soon.

Bringing the flower into focus showed me this new bloom had already collected some debris. Upon closer inspection, it became clear the stringy litter was actually the legs of a Daddy Long Legs {Pholcus phalangioides} spider. As a child they were part of summer’s entertainment; watching them climb brick walls was fun and for some reason they were a favorite critter to hold. I am friendly only from a distance with other spiders. Somehow, these Daddys seemed harmless to me. Perhaps my experiences with them as a child served to buffer fears of introducing “Rosey”, the Rosy Haired Tarantula, as a classroom pet.

Perennial favorite Purple Coneflower beginning to bloom. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Perennial favorite Purple Coneflower beginning to bloom. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Closeup of new Purple Coneflower bloom  accompanied by Daddy Long Leg spider. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Closeup of new Purple Coneflower bloom accompanied by Daddy Long Leg spider. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Tranquil attention-getters…


Feathery plumes of tiny flowers bring prominent attention to this shade-loving, summer bloom. In the fall, it is often Goldenrods in their golden show or many perennials’ seed heads that create such a fuzzy manifestation. These bunches are the low blossoming Astilbe perennial used as border plants in one of my beds surrounded by Pachysandra ground cover. It is one of my least aggressive plants, so I regularly defend it’s territory, thinning out invading, more prolific, species. This year’s blooms are more outstanding in part due to our very wet spring and early summer.

Ants on blooming Astilbe plumes. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Ants on blooming Astilbe plumes. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Blooming Astilbe among Pachysandra ground cover. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Blooming Astilbe among Pachysandra ground cover. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Youthful awkwardness…


Young Robin with some remaining new-born downy feathers. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Young Robin with some remaining new-born downy feathers. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Late in May, this young Robin appeared on one of the first-flight days for this young Robin. We startled him/her when we lunched on our patio next to their nest in our evergreen shrub. Six weeks later the Robin no longer visits the nest but has discovered the joy in bathing.

Young Robin socializing with neighboring Sparrow. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Young Robin socializing with neighboring Sparrow. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Young Robin with still some new-born downy feathers. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Young Robin’s ruffled wet feathers after bathing in our garden’s birdbath. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg